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Part 2 of 3: Casting Your LineIdentify where you want to throw your line and rotate your body. …Flip the bail on your spool to unlock the line. The bail is the thin strip of plastic or metal that connects to opposite sides of your reel.Raise the rod over your dominant shoulder. Slowly and carefully lift your rod, keeping the end of the fishing pole pointing away from you as you do it.Throw your rod by propelling your forearm towards your target. Use your elbow as a hinge to propel your wrist in the direction that you want to cast.Release your line by lifting your finger as you cast it. …

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  • How do you replace fishing line on reel?

  • Tie the end of the new line to the arbor (reel spool) on your spinning reel. Use an arbor knot to secure the line to your reel spool. Wrap the line by hand around the reel spool about five or six times. This will give the line traction when you turn the handle, letting it begin to gather around the spool.

  • How do you make a fishing rod?

  • To make a fishing rod, place 3 sticks and 2 strings in the 3×3 crafting grid. When making a fishing rod, it is important that the sticks and strings are placed in the exact pattern as the image below. In the first row, there should be 1 stick in the third box. In the second row, there should be 1 stick in…

  • What size fishing pole?

  • Spinning rods are where most anglers are going to start. The most common size of this style fishing pole is between 5’10 and 7′ in length . When it comes to bass fishing, I recommend not having a spinning rod with an action that is heavier then a medium and always use one with a fast or even extra fast tip.

  • What are the parts of a fishing pole?

  • An old fashioned fishing pole is made of cane, has no guides and the line is attached to the tip (it has no reel). The basic parts of a rod: Butt Cap: This is at the bottom of the handle: sometimes made of rubber, sometimes of cork. This is the end you might press into your stomach if you’re fighting a good fish.