[tp widget="default/tpw_default.php"]

how to become a fishing guide in montana插图

How do I get a Montana guide license?

The Montana Board of Outfitters regulates guides and outfitters. The qualifications for a person applying for a Guide License are: Must be 18 years of age or older. Must possess a valid Montana Wildlife Conservation License along with a Montana hunting and fishing license.

How much do fly fishing guides make in Montana?

The Montana Fishing Guide School is the ideal place to learn the trade of being a fly fishing guide or to become a better angler. Fishing guides can earn up to $10,000 a month or more during the busy season.

What is the Montana fishing guide school?

The Montana Fishing Guide School is built on the foundation of great teaching from our world-class instructors with over 100 years combined guiding, outfitting, retail, lodge management, and instructional experience. Organized and managed by Gallatin River Guides fly shop and career guide and outfitter, Mike Donaldson.

What are the requirements to become a fishing guide?

Must meet one of the following requirements in the area to be guided in: 1) have at least one season experience of hunting and fishing, 2) have worked for 6 weeks for the outfitter signing the license, or 3) have received training as a guide from a board-approved school.

What is Montana fishing school?

The Montana Fishing Guide School is built on the foundation of great teaching from our world-class instructors with over 100 years combined guiding, outfitting, retail, lodge management, and instructional experience.

How much do fishing guides make?

Fishing guides can earn up to $10,000 a month or more during the busy season. The cost of the guide school is a small investment in giving you the confidence in landing the guide job you’ve always wanted or for taking your guiding and fishing to the next level.

What rivers are open for fishing in Montana?

The Gallatin, Madison, Yellowstone, and Missouri Rivers, as well as private lakes, spring creeks, and smaller freestone rivers offer some of the best opportunities to challenge your angling ability and learn the profession of guiding. We fish a variety of waters in seven days, not the same river every day. Montana’s Fishing Waters.

Where is Don Mutert’s fishing school?

The Montana Fishing Guide School helped Don Mutert become a successful guide at Epic Angling and Adventure in Alaska. We checked in with Don to get some of his thoughts from his week in guide school.

Where is Darren Ward now?

Darren Ward knew he had what it took to be a guide. He just needed the foundation and a nudge in the right direction. He’s now guiding for a high-end lodge in Utah.

Guide School and Training in Montana

In Montana, our research showed the below requirements to become a hunting guide or fishing guide. Before operating as a guide ensure that you contact your states wildlife agency directly to verify all requirements.

Basic requirements for Fishing Guide Jobs in Montana

All guides must be registered with the Montana board of Outfitters: http://bsd.dli.mt.gov/license/bsd_boards/out_board/board_page.asp

Basic requirements for Hunting Guide Jobs in Montana

All guides must be registered with the Montana board of Outfitters: http://bsd.dli.mt.gov/license/bsd_boards/out_board/board_page.asp

What is Montana angler fly fishing?

We’ve been in this business for a long time and have worked with hundreds of guides on rivers throughout the West. We understand that a knowledgeable, patient and enthusiastic guide can make your Montana fishing trip truly unforgettable. Our team is comprised of several of the most respected professionals in the industry – the best of the best. Our guests describe our all-star crew as patient, passionate and fun. We look for guides that are not only superb fisherman, but also great teachers with expert rowing skills. Montana Angler Fly Fishing is one of Montana’s only outfitters that offers both traditional drift boat trips and remote canyon floats in fly fishing equipped whitewater rafts. Thanks to our seasoned guides, our ratio of returning clientele is one of the best in the business!

Where is Nathan from Yellowstone?

After growing up on a ranch in rural California, Nathan’s career in the world of culinary arts lead him to Yellowstone National Park where he served as executive chef at the renowned Snow Lodge. Finding himself surrounded by pristine trout water fueled his existing passion for fly fishing and Nathan began guiding full time in the greater Yellowstone region. Nathan now has over a decade of guide seasons under his belt within Yellowstone Park and the various blue ribbon trout rivers of southwest Montana. Nathan loves sharing his extensive knowledge of the region with guests that come to Montana to chase trout. From technical angling on spring creeks to classic drift boat floats on the Yellowstone River, Nathan’s guidance and expertise on the water is sure to improve the skills of any angler, regardless of experience level.

Where is Doug from Montana?

Doug is a true fly fishing fanatic. He is comfortable on the larger blue ribbon rivers and also excels at finding off the beaten path wade fisheries. Doug spent several years working and fly fishing in Yellowstone Park when he moved to Montana and is our resident guru on the legendary waters in the Park. He is a Georgia native where he grew up chasing brook trout in the Appalachian mountains. He received a B.S. in Social Science education and helps author fly fishing articles for the Montana Angler blog in the offseason.

How many days a year does Matt go fishing?

Matt is the kind of guy that makes mortal men jealous. There isn’t a week that goes by that he isn’t fishing, skiing, hiking or rafting. He spends over 140 days a year guiding fishing trips on Montana waters and in the off season he travels and hosts international trips to Patagonia, New Zealand and beyond.

Where is Jared from?

Jared is a native of the Gallatin Valley where he grew up fishing the Madison, Gallatin, Yellowstone and countless smaller waters as his home waters. Jared is a passionate outdoorsman and spends nearly all of his time guiding fishing, fishing on his own, archery hunting or working on a large ranch near Springdale in the offseason. He has a fisheries and wildlife management degree from Montana State University and is eager to share his extensive knowledge of the diverse ecosystems found in our local watersheds with our guests. Jared’s confident and easy going personality are traits that are greatly appreciated by his guests. He has a careful eye and knows when to sprinkle in some well timed instruction or back things off a bit if he senses frustration. Few guides will work harder on the water than Jared.

Where is Luke from?

Luke was born in Livingston, Montana to a fly fishing family. Luke’s father was among the earliest fly fishing guides in southwest Montana and passed that passion along to his two children. Having spent a lifetime fishing, hiking, skiing, and biking all over Montana and beyond, Luke is eager to share his passion for fishing and the outdoors with his clients. After graduating from Colorado College with a BS in Biology, he returned to Montana and pursued a life outdoors that has included fishing and guiding over much of Southwest Montana , working as a wilderness ranger, fighting fires on a hot shot team, and a working wilderness educator. During the winter months in Bozeman, Luke is a professional ski patroller at Bridger Bowl ski area.

How old was Jeff when he started fly fishing?

Jeff was given his first fly rod at the age of twelve and never looked back. He has been perfecting his Montana fly-fishing knowledge for over 20 years on local rivers, streams and lakes. He is also an award winning science teacher at Belgrade Middle School.

How do I become a licensed Guide in Montana?

The Montana Board of Outfitters regulates guides and outfitters. The qualifications for a person applying for a Guide License are:

How to become an outfitter in Montana?

If you meet those qualifications, you can download the 12-page application at the supplied link below; submit the completed Outfitter License/Examination Application in person or by mail to the Montana Board of Outfitters along with a check or money order for the nonrefundable application fee. Submit your application well in advance of the next scheduled examination date as it will take the Board a minimum of 30 days to investigate and verify an application. The board may require an inspection of your equipment. You must also provide proof of liability insurance before your outfitter license is issued.

What is the difference between a Guide and an Outfitter?

A guide must work for a licensed outfitter, and any clients they guide must come from their outfitter.

What license do you need to hunt in Montana?

Must possess a valid Montana Wildlife Conservation License along with a Montana hunting and fishing license. Follow the link below for information on these licenses.

Does the Red Cross of Montana offer hands on classes?

Must have a current first aid certification. The American Red Cross of Montana offer hands on classes in many Montana towns throughout the year. To find one near you, follow the link below. After your hands-on certification, you may take the renewal test online at the address furnished on the board website below.

What is a Fishing Guide?

Fishing guides are paid to take clients fishing. Pure and simple. Fishing guides are experienced fishermen and outdoorsmen (and women) who are familiar with the local waterways, know how to catch fish there, and are personal in a way that makes clients enjoy their time and build strong memories.

What do you need to be a good fishing guide?

You have to have at least a good understanding of fish behavior, patterning, fishing tactics, and boatmanship if you are going to be a successful fishing guide. Clients are paying you good money for your expertise and the hope of catching some nice fish. If you don’t know your stuff, people will pick up on that.

How much does a fishing guide make?

An estimate I read a while back was the average full-time fishing guide made between $35,000 and $60,000 annually.

How to get sponsorship for fishing?

If you really want to score a sponsorship, be proactive. Get your name out there. Reach out to companies explaining what you do. Enter into major fishing tournaments and do well. Attend major sportsman shows and fishing industry events. Fishing companies can’t sponsor you if they don’t know you. Like I said, being sponsored is not for every guide but it can be worthwhile for some guides.

What to do if you aren’t passionate about fishing?

Decide what type of fishing you enjoy most and immerse yourself heavily in it. If you need to move to do so, move.

How can I become a better fisherman?

Yes, I still think you need to become the best fisherman you can but during this phase, you should develop your fishing knowledge and intuition, along with your soft skills. Interpersonal skills will become key. Work on your teaching ability, your patience, and your ability to make people around you feel at ease .

Why is intuition important in fishing?

Having fishing intuition is great for delivering fish on the deck but sound judgment is important for making clear decisions that keep everyone safe and improve the customer experience. By improving your own personal judgment, you will in turn become a more successful fishing guide in the long run. 7. Courteousness.